The Jordan Issue II: On To The Next One

INGLEWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 1: Kobe Bryant #8 of the Los Angeles Lakers defends against Michael Jordan #23 of the Chicago Bulls on February 1, 1998 at The Forum in Inglewood, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1998 NBAE (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

People love to compare things when it comes to the sports’ world. It’s something that both the fans and the media seem to be completely obsessed with. Which team is better? Which player is better? Which era is better? The debates sports fanatics can have are endless. In many ways it’s impossible to compare players and teams from different times. The game changes at such a rapid pace that it’s truly unfair to everyone involved to play the “who’s better” game.

There was a time when every rookie class that entered the NBA had at least one player that was compared to Michael Jordan. It was basically an unwritten rule that every start of the season would see a new “ the next Jordan.” Most of the time the individuals given “the next” label failed to live up to the hype. The main problem with the label was that it was mostly based on marketing potential and how good of a dunker the player was. In many ways the comparisons to Jordan were almost insulting to the basketball icon. The appraisals were always based on superficial aspects of his game and never on his work ethic, fundamentals or determination on the court.

ATLANTA - FEBRUARY 9: NBA All-Star Michael Jordan (L) of the Washington Wizards watches Kobe Bryant (R) of the Los Angeles Lakers miss his second free throw that would have ended the NBA All-Star game at Philips Arena on February 9, 2003 in Atlanta, Georgia. Kevin Garnett was named the most valuable player in the West's 155-145 double over-time win against the East all-stars. (Photo by: Jeff Haynes/AFP/Getty Images)

Kobe Bryant is one of the few (if not the only) players to live up to the Jordan expectations. Physically, Bryant shared many similarities to Jordan and that made it easy for the press to label him the next Jordan. When Bryant came into the league in 1996 his body was eerily similar to a young Jordan’s body. Like MJ, Kobe was 6’6 and had a wiry athletic frame. His mannerisms and moves on the court were also startlingly similar to the Bulls’ legend.

Bryant was instantly a fan favorite because of his charisma and electrifying style of play. Outside of looking like a Jordan clone when he shot or dunked a ball—Kobe didn’t accomplish very much early in his career to justify labeling him the second coming of MJ. His first few years in the league were filled with exciting plays and his potential was impossible to deny—but that was the extent of his impact. There were many glaring weaknesses in his game—weaknesses that MJ did not possess. The Lakers’ star struggled on the defensive end of the court and he had difficulties with finishing games early on. Those were things that Jordan seemed to have a mastery of right from the start of his career. Much of Jordan’s polish as a young player was probably a result of him playing 3 years of college basketball at North Carolina. Bryant came into the league straight out of high school—and that resulted in him being a lot less refined as a youngster than Jordan was.

LOS ANGELES - MARCH 28: Kobe Bryant #8 of the Los Angeles Lakers helps up Michael Jordan#23 of the Washington Wizards during the game between the Washington Wizards and the Los Angeles Lakers on March 28, 2003 at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Vince Bucci/Getty Images)

In a truly interesting turn of events the Los Angeles Lakers named Phil Jackson their head coach in 1999. Jackson was able to nurture Bryant’s game and help take it to another level—the same way he did with Michael Jordan when he coached the Chicago Bulls. The Lakers’ guard learned to be more composed at the end of games and his defensive prowess became a real strength. Kobe Bryant won all 5 of his championships with Phil Jackson as his coach.

The Jordan and Kobe comparisons became more prominent when Bryant came under the tutelage of Jackson—and as he started to win titles. The assessments started to alter as Kobe began to make a name for himself throughout the league. Instead of people pointing out the ways Kobe was similar to Jordan—people started to ask whether or not Kobe Bryant was as good if not better than him. Rather than analyze the two players’ parallels the media and fans started to put the two icons into competition. Who was the better athlete—Jordan or Kobe? Who was the better competitor? Who was the better scorer? The questions and debates started to rage amongst the basketball faithful.

INGLEWOOD, CA - 1998: Kobe Bryant #8 of the Los angeles Lakers keeps the ball away from Michael Jordan #23 of the Chicago Bulls as he back in closer to the basket during an NBA game at The Great Western Forum in Inglewood, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1998 NBAE (Photo by Andy Hayt/NBAE via Getty Images)

Comparing basketball players is nearly impossible and it really does boil down to simply a matter of ones own perspective. MJ is older than Bryant and as a young boy Kobe idolized Jordan. You can definitely make the argument that Kobe might not have become the player he did without the blueprint his idol made for him many years earlier.

Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant are arguably the two greatest players that ever lived. I believe Jordan gets the edge over Bryant by a wide margin for numerous reasons. I think the biggest factor when you compare the two is that Jordan came first. Jordan set the bar that Bryant has to try and reach—and as of 2015 Bryant has one less championship ring than MJ.

Regardless if you think Jordan gets the edge over Kobe, or vice versa, you can’t deny the greatness of the duo. It’s almost a slight to them both to compare them because it makes one of them a loser. Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant are a gift from the basketball gods and we should all just be grateful to have them and avoid the temptation to compare and contrast the pair—no matter how much fun it is to do.

ATLANTA - FEBRUARY 9: Kobe Bryant #8 of the Western Conference All Stars talks with Michael Jordan #23 of the Eastern conference All Stars during the 2003 NBA All-Star Game at the Phillips Arena on February 9, 2003 in Atlanta, Georgia. The West won 155-145 in the first ever double-overtime All-Star Game. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2003 NBAE (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE/Getty Images)

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